Ajahn Chah never planned before he started speaking, as the job of the teacher was to get out of the way and let the Dhamma arise according to the needs of the moment.
—Ajahn Amaro, An Introduction to the Life and Teachings of Ajahn Chah

Talks

The North Coast Buddhist Sangha meets Monday evenings from 7:00 to 8:30 to meditate, listen to a talk, and share reflections. On the third Monday of every month from April through December, a teaching monk (ajahn) from Abhayagiri Monastery, which mentors Three Jewels, visits to lead the meeting in person. Learn more about these master teachers.

The following recordings of the monks' visits are each divided into three sections of about ½ an hour each so that you can easily navigate the entire session of approximately 1½ hours. In the meditation segments, ambient sounds and recording noises have been silenced during substantial pauses in the teacher's guidance. Thus, you should be able to use each meditation recording for a complete guided meditation experience lasting about ½ an hour and concluding with a final bell.

 

Bringing Meditation into Daily Life


Ajahn Pasanno
May 16, 2016

Ajahn Ñāniko

The Buddha taught that in each of us the mind/heart is intrinsically radiant and pure, though often overwhelmed by transient obstructions. We allow visitors, chiefly uninvited, to become guests in the mind. We can retrain such habits to reconnect with our innate clarity. The Buddha's description of mindfulness is not of a passive state, rather one which requires effort to overcome unwholesome patterns and support wholesome states. Awakening is the natural result of the quality of knowing which we develop in meditation. Key practices to this development include mindfulness, discernment, recollection, and relinquishment. The essence of Buddhist practice is to nurture trust and confidence in this process.

 

meditatator   Meditation

26:28  

 

  Teaching

35:03 

 

  Discussion

17:15 


Flexibility and Gratitude


Ajahn Ñāniko
September 21, 2015

Ajahn Ñāniko

This wide-ranging yet deeply unified talk gathers many strands of Buddhist teachings and conveys their shared basis in the values of flexibility and gratitude. Ajahn Ñāniko recounts how a tudong (walking journey), enabled him to spend time with Native Americans, inspiring him to investigate connections between Native American and Buddhist teachings. Both traditions consider it very spiritually healthy for the mind to go into uncertainty. The Native American vision quest is not so far from the Buddhist tudong.

As well as flexibility, grateful homage is both a requisite for and result of escape from the rut of “me” in which we find ourselves. “Those who don’t hold something higher than themselves have no true happiness.”

 

meditatator   Meditation

29:20  

 

  Teaching

25:44 

 

  Discussion

35:56 

 

The Buddhist Path


Ajahn Pasanno
June 15, 2015

Ajahn Pasanno

Buddhism is “a complete path that trains our whole being” rather than a philosophy to study. Ajahn Pasanno focuses on the Buddha’s initial teaching of the Four Noble Truths to reflect on the nature and use of desire, the role of meditation, nuances of translation, and many other aspects of the practice. The Buddha remains an example that there is a possibility of real peace, happiness, and well-being “that isn’t shaken by anything and is possible for anybody.”

 

meditatator   Meditation

26:56  

 

  Teaching

32:50 

 

  Discussion

29:11 

 

Hallmarks of the Teachings


Ajahn Ñāniko
May 18, 2015

Ajahn Ñāniko

The way of the world is to suffer. The way of the Buddha’s practice is to go against the stream of the world and end suffering. The practice is to cultivate virtuous behavior, mental steadiness, and wisdom. It is a way of learning how to live, “not a matter of contemplating the right thing until a huge light hits us and our problems are solved.” Thus, any situation that arises represents an opportunity to practice.

Ajahn Ñāniko also discusses monastic practices, including functions with lay people. He describes the monastery as “a kind of public property” in which the monks are “like wildlife.”

 

meditatator   Meditation

28:24  

 

  Teaching

32:08  

 

  Discussion

33:42 

 

Meditation and the Hindrances


Ajahn Karuṇadhammo
December 15, 2014

residents_karunadhammo

Although not the entirety of Buddhist practice, meditation is the entry point for many westerners to Buddhism as well as an essential practice to develop a clear and settled state of mind. The Buddha described the Five Hindrances as chief obstructions to clarity and calm. Beyond the words necessary to describe them, the Hindrances refer to actual experiences of affective states of the mind and heart. This talk concludes with a meditation that enables the listener to experience the desired state of the absence of the Hindrances.

 

meditatator   Meditation

26:54  

 

  Teaching

36:58 

 

  Discussion

28:21  


Learning from Everything


Ajahn Pasanno
June 16, 2014

Ajahn Pasanno

The Buddha pointed to an experiential perspective rather than to ideas and philosophies. The tools for learning to see our experience more clearly and then make wholesome choices based on this insight lie all about us in our ordinary lives: “We all experience happiness and suffering, wanting and not wanting, liking and disliking, and it’s right at that point that we can learn. That’s where we study, that’s where we practice.”

 

meditatator   Meditation

29:10  

 

  Teaching

34:01 

 

  Discussion

25:40 


Pilgrimage


Ajahn Ñāniko
November 18, 2013

Ajahn Ñāniko

Ajahn Ñāniko shares an adventure he took with another young monk in the summer of 2013 walking on a tudong (pilgrimage) from Abhayagiri in Redwood Valley, California, to Pacific Hermitage in White Salmon, Washington. Pacific Hermitage has followed Abhayagiri as the second monastery in the United States founded on the Thai Forest Tradition of Ajahn Chah. See photos of the pilgrimage.

 

meditatator   Meditation

27:59  

 

  Teaching

01:17:37  

 

  Discussion

22:29 


Monastic and Lay Life


Ajahn Jotipãlo
October 21, 2013

residents_jotipalo

Ajahn Jotipãlo describes monastic life and how its many rules can actually enhance freedom. He explains how The Buddha intended some of these rules to establish a symbiotic relationship between the lay and monastic communities to insure that monks would remain useful to laypeople. Ajahn Jotipãlo also explains how and why Abhayagiri was founded.

 

meditatator   Meditation

29:43  

 

  Teaching

33:31  

 

  Discussion

24:21  


Khamma and Rebirth


Ajahn Karuṇadhammo
May 20, 2013

residents_karunadhammo

Although they have at times been ignored and misunderstood in the West, Ajahn Karuṇadhammo explains how the Buddha taught khamma and rebirth not chiefly as articles of belief but more as a useful set of strategies. They can strengthen our commitment to a process that doesn't always bring immediate results. We can be motivated to adopt a long-term perspective in achieving sustainable contentment and happiness.

 

meditatator   Meditation

30:16  

 

  Teaching

31:12  

 

  Discussion

33:15  


Knowing and
Letting Go


Ajahn Pasanno
April 22, 2013

residents_naniko

Beginning with the complementary processes of knowing and letting go as fundamental to meditation the abbot of Abhayagiri explains and ties together many aspects of Buddhist practice. He presents meditation as a way to build a refuge of peace within ourselves. He also speaks of the need to apply our meditation skills in the arena of daily life, as well as when we are sitting on a cushion. His rich meditation guidance is well worth repeated listening, even through the recording flaws during its first 16 seconds.

 

meditatator   Meditation

30:54  

 

  Teaching

25:37  

 

  Discussion

19:46  


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